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March 11, 2019

Colloquium with Tithi Bhattacharya

Thursday February 21
2:00-3:50pm
Colloquium with Tithi Bhattacharya, Purdue University
“Capitalism and the Social Reproduction of Abjection”
110 Willamette Hall
Flyer
Contact: Camisha Russell

February 5, 2019

Resistant Imaginations Conference

Friday February 1 and Saturday February 2
9:30am-5:30pm
Resistant Imaginations Conference
All events will be held in the Knight Library Browsing Room

  • Friday February 1 at 4:00pm
    Keynote Address by Gaile Pohlhaus, Miami University
    “Horizontal Attention and the Resilient Imagination”
  • Saturday February 2 at 4:00pm
    Keynote Address by José Medina, Northwestern University
    “Imagining Otherwise: Hermeneutical Alienation and Resistant Imaginations”

Call for Papers
Conference Program
Poster
Contact: Camisha Russell

January 25, 2019

Data Ethics Job Search Research Presentation of Ramon Alvarado

Thursday January 24
2:00-3:30pm
Data Ethics Job Search Research Presentation of Ramon Alvarado (University of Kansas, Philosophy)
“Epistemic Injustice in Data Science”
110 Willamette Hall
Contact: Colin Koopman

Data Ethics Job Search Research Presentation of Emanuele Ratti

Thursday January 17
2:00-3:30pm
Data Ethics Job Search Research Presentation of Emanuele Ratti (Notre Dame University, Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values)
“Epistemic and Contextual Opacity in Machine Learning”
110 Willamette Hall
Contact: Colin Koopman

Data Ethics Job Search Research Presentation of Daniel Hicks

Tuesday January 15
2:00-3:30pm
Data Ethics Job Search Research Presentation of Daniel Hicks (UC Davis, Data Science Initiative)
“Explainable Machine Learning: An Integrated Epistemic-Ethical Analysis”
Knight Library Browsing Room
Contact: Colin Koopman

November 5, 2018

Colloquium with Claudia Baracchi

Thursday November 1
4:00-5:20pm
Colloquium with Claudia Baracchi, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca
“Dionysus and Plato: Immortality Without Me”
110 Willamette Hall
Poster
Contact: Erin McKenna

Undergraduate Lecture with Claudia Baracchi

Wednesday October 31
4:00-5:20pm
Undergraduate Lecture with Claudia Baracchi, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca
“Lighting up Human Nature”
150 Columbia Hall
Poster
Contact: Erin McKenna

October 30, 2018

Amy Billingsley Holds Dissertation Defense on Monday December 3


Doctoral Candidate Amy Billingsley will defend her dissertation “Humorwork, Feminist Philosophy, and Unstable Politics” on Monday December 3 at 8:00am in the Philosophy Department Conference Room (250C Susan Campbell Hall) on the University of Oregon campus.

This Defense is free of charge and open to the public.

Billingsley Dissertation Defense Poster

October 29, 2018

Northwest Reading Group in American Philosophy

Saturday October 27
9:00am-4:00pm
“The Aesthetics of Everyday Life”
directed by Mark Johnson and Jay Schulkin
Adobe Inn in Yachats, OR
Contact Erin McKenna to RSVP for lunch & dinner

October 17, 2018

Community Philosophy Circle “What’s Luck Got to Do With It?”

Our next public philosophy event takes place on Tuesday October 30th at 6:00pm in the Downtown Eugene Public Library.

We cannot think of a more timely topic in the context of today’s public and political discourse than “What’s Luck Got to Do With It?”

Should we define our individual or collective successes and failures in life in terms of personal responsibility, grit and hard work? Or should we take stock of our lives by acknowledging luck and a variety of circumstances that are beyond our control?

Two people are texting on their cell phones while driving their car. Driver #1 manages to text for several minutes without getting into an accident. Driver #2 texts for only half a minute but, during this time, fails to notice a child who has run into the street chasing after a ball. How should we judge each driver? If we assess their actions alone, then both are equally at fault. If we take into account the consequences of their texting behaviors, then one driver was just lucky while the other was guilty of a serious crime.

So how should we judge our actions and the actions of others? Should people be evaluated by the choices they make? Or by the consequences of those choices?

Is each of us simply the product of circumstances that are largely beyond our control? If that’s true, then how much of who we are is based on luck and how much comes from our initiative and hard work? Is an undocumented person caught at the border someone who chose to break the law, or an unlucky victim of poverty or political repression? Should a billionaire CEO of a pharmaceutical company take credit for his accumulation of wealth and power if family upbringing, educational opportunities and inheritance played major roles in his success?

In other words, when it comes to assessing praise or blame, what’s luck got to do with it?

Come to the next Community Philosophy Circle to explore these questions together. And feel free to pass this message and poster on to friends!

All ages are welcome, and all public philosophy events are free.

For more information, contact Paul Bodin or Caroline Lundquist.

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